Article from Maine Windjammer Association August 2018 Newsletter ()
April 28, 2015
Spring Cleaning, Part I

credit: Shary Fellows
On a snowy day in mid April, the Schooner Lewis R. French was the first to haul out at North End Shipyard for her annual inspection. A temporary crewmember showed up just for the day.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Kelsey Kraft is back for her second year, this time as First Mate aboard the Schooner Lewis R. French. She and her fellow crewmembers are taking advantage of great painting weather, since the French is no longer “under wraps.”

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Captain Garth Wells is looking forward to his 12th season as owner-caretaker of the Lewis R. French, the oldest commercial schooner in America.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Rebecca Johnson is Mate this season aboard the Schooner Mary Day.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Everything gets a fresh coat of paint aboard Schooner Mary Day.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Winter covers provide a dry, bright and warm(er) place to work during Maine’s finicky spring season. Meet Tom Macom, deckhand aboard the Mary Day.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Captain Doug Lee replaces some decking aboard his beloved Heritage, the schooner he and his wife Linda built and launched in 1983. The uncovered deck beams looked great after 30-plus years, thanks to the meticulous attention the couple devote to their schooner each year.

 

credit: Meg Maiden

Captain Linda Lee focuses on caulking the seams on the cabin top.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
After more than three decades of the anchor chain chafing the deck below the windlass, Captains Doug and Linda decided to replace some of the forward decking. The cupped planks will be replaced with three-inch-thick Maine white pine that’s been seasoning in the Lees’ garage for the past four years.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
Hailing from New York, Christa Miller-Shelley is back for her second year as Mate aboard Schooner American Eagle.

 

credit: Meg Maiden
There is no shortage of projects during outfitting season, as Captain Brenda Thomas of the Schooner Isaac H. Evans can attest! All of the smaller, moveable boat parts are varnished or painted in the workshop. Larger items, like the main mast, must be serviced outdoors. Lucky for Captain Brenda and assistant Harley Haskell, this year the masts were removed for inspection, making it much easier to apply paint and varnish.

 

Stay tuned for next month’s installment of Spring Cleaning, Part II. For more information the Maine Windjammer Association, click here.


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