Article from MAINE WINDJAMMER ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER ()
March 27, 2013
Turning Back the Clock: Fab '60s Style Aboard Maine's Windjammers
From the Archives of Muffy Aldrich

Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com  
 
The mod boat-neck tunic with three-quarter sleeves, the oversized Wayfarer glasses, white shorts cut just so, what could be cooler than pulling on a line aboard a 19th-century schooner?  
Recently, The Daily Prep blogger, Muffy Aldrich, posted a treasure trove of photographs her father took while enjoying a fabulous week windjamming in Maine in 1964. She generously shared the images from her archives with us and we’ve created a photo gallery so you can get a sense of the fab 60s style that graced the decks of Maine’s windjammers, lo! those many years ago.

Since 1936, when Frank Swift announced his first “windjamming” cruise off Camden, Maine, people from every walk of life hoping to experience the outdoors in a safe, relaxed way, have turned to the Maine windjammers for fantastic, memorable vacations. And while the years have gone by, the experience has remained essentially the same: fabulous sailing combined with gorgeous scenery, delicious food, beachside lobster bakes and delightful companions. The only difference between then and now might be the style.

Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
This young woman uses a classic 35mm range finder to photograph the spectacular coast of Maine.

Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com

Guests mingle on the decks of a gorgeously preserved 19th-century schooner.

Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Fabulous bathing suits and beach coveralls make perfect deck wear on a warm day.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Young guests lie on deck as a 19th century schooner sails along the coast past a lighthouse in the distance.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
This young beauty sports plaid pants, an adorable white collar blouse with headband to match and a bulky sweater – perfect for the overcast day.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Some days a thick sweater is the perfect deck wear aboard Maine’s windjammers.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Warm days allow passengers to enjoy sunbathing while others help run the ship. There are no requirements – everyone is free to do as they please.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Once they’re anchored for the night, passengers are free to swim, row in the harbor or go exploring on land.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Windjamming is for people who love the outdoors. This passenger loves her high-waisted Wrangler culottes anchored for the afternoon in the calm waters of a protected harbor.
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
Early evening activities might include casting a line – this passenger got lucky!
 
Courtesy MuffyAldrich.com
 
There is no set itinerary aboard Maine’s windjammers – every day requires charting a course that depends on wind and tide.

For more information about sailing aboard one of the ten vessels belonging to the Maine Windjammer Association, visit www.sailmainecoast.com or call 800-807-WIND.


Published by Maine Windjammer Association
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