Wednesday, September 24, 2008 D-Tools September 2008 Newsletter   VOLUME 8 ISSUE 9  
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CONTENTS
D-Tools Celebrates 10 Year Anniversary at CEDIA Expo
Adam Stone Reflects on CEDIA 2008
A SmartShape is Worth 1000 Symbols
Adding a Wire Legend in Visio
HDMI Defined
Deliver Your Value
Momentum Building for 2008 D-Tools Design Awards
Manufacturer Vantage Point (MVP) News for September
HDMI Defined
http://www.dipartner.com
by Todd B. Adams

High-Definition
Multimedia Interface

High-Definition Multimedia Interface™ (HDMI) is a connection standard which carries uncompressed high-definition digital video, up to 8 separate channels of uncompressed digital audio and command control. While there are many benefits to the HDMI standard, the following are the most common.

HDMI Benefits by Target Market

  • Consumers — A one cable solution make connections simpler
  • CE Manufactures — A lower cost, and standard method, of connecting components
  • Movie Studios — A means to protect content
  • PC Manufactures — A bridged gap between consumer electronics and personal computers
  • Everyone — A standard that allows upgrades to allow unforeseen future technologies

In December of 2002, those goals were realized as the HDMI 1.0 standard and the HDMI connector. HDMI was created as a forward-looking specification with the ability to be updated as further market requirements arose. This is a benefit in that HDMI continues to evolve to meet future digital connection demands.

HDMI Version Updates

1.1 Added support for DVD Audio

1.2 Added support for SACD Audio, Permitted PC applications to use only RGB color space

1.3 Increases bandwidth to 10.2Gbps, Offers support for 16-bit color, increased refresh rates (ex. 120 Hz), support for 1440p/ WQXGA resolutions, Supports xvYCC color space standard, Adds features to automatically correct audio video synchronization (lip sync), Adds mini connector, Adds support for Dolby® TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio standards

HDMI Connector Pinout

SC Securing Cables.ai

Pin 1

TMDS Data2+

Pin 11

TMDS Clock Shield

Pin 2

TMDS Data2 Shield

Pin 12

TMDS Clock-

Pin 3

TMDS Data2-

Pin 13

CEC

Pin 4

TMDS Data1+

Pin 14

Reserved (N.C. on device)

Pin 5

TMDS Data1 Shield

Pin 15

SCL

Pin 6

TMDS Data1-

Pin 16

SDA

Pin 7

TMDS Data0+

Pin 17

DDC/CEC Ground

Pin 8

TMDS Data0 Shield

Pin 18

+5 V Power

Pin 9

TMDS Data0-

Pin 19

Hot Plug Detect

Pin 10

TMDS Clock+

HDMI Bandwidth Requirements

The bandwidth sent through the HDMI chips and cabling are dependent upon the format of the digital signal. A simple way to calculate the video bandwidth of a digital cable is by the following formula :

Bandwidth = Signal Resolution * Frame Rate * Color Depth

Format

Horizontal Pixels

Vertical Pixels

Pixels / Frame

Frames / Second

Color Depth (Bits / pixel)

Bandwidth Mbps (MHz)

480 60p 8b

640

480

307,200

60

8

147 (5)

720 60p 8b

1280

720

921,600

60

8

442 (15)

1080 60i 8b

1920

540

1,036,800

60

8

498 (17)

1080 60p 8b

1920

1080

2,073,600

60

8

995 (33)

1080 60p 12b

1920

1080

2,073,600

60

12

1493 (50)

HDMI Cable Length

DVI is limited to a maximum of 15 feet (5 meters), while HDMI is designed to perform better over longer lengths; up to about 50 feet (15 meters). The maximum cable length is highly dependent on both the bandwidth as well as the DVI or HDMI cable build-quality.

This article is an excerpt from Residential Integrator’s Design Secrets, found at www.dipartner.com


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