Chicago Baseball Museum

July 31, 2007 A 501(c)(3) non-profit organization   VOLUME 2007 ISSUE 3  
TOPICS
News
Baseball Books
Support CBM
CONTENTS
A “Hey-Hey!” for Jack Brickhouse
John Ely Homecoming
Collecting Chicago
The Business of Baseball
Beer and Baseball: A Look Back
Casey Crosby
A Chicago Tavern
Andrew "Rube" Foster Excerpt
Wrigley Field's Last World Series
Pre-National League Excerpt
We Want To Hear From You!
Donate to CBM
Volunteer
Promote CBM
A “Hey-Hey!” for Jack Brickhouse
by Dave Schwan

The Brickhouse Chicken dish introduced at the 200 East Supper Club in the Seneca Hotel. (photo courtesy of the OTBAC) Ask anyone who the players were on their home team growing up and they’ll tell you. Then ask them who called the games on their local radio or TV station and it’s a good bet they can tell you that, too. For us Cubs fans growing up in the 1960s, it was, of course, Jack Brickhouse on WGN-TV.
[FULL STORY]
 
John Ely Homecoming
Ely leaves Chicago a Redhawk and returns with White Sox
by Robert Henderson

For the past three years, the Homewood-Flossmoor (Ill.) native has called Miami University of Ohio home. When the Redhawks would travel to the Chicago area to play other Mid-American Conference teams, such as Northern Illinois University, Ely would always have a mini-homecoming.
[FULL STORY]
 
Collecting Chicago
by Ted Golden

The mid-western United States has provided sports memorabilia collectors with a bevy of opportunities for a very long time. Chicago is to the north what my hometown (Atlanta, GA) is to the south: It’s the epicenter of the region. In recent years, sports collectors have flocked to the city in order to attend “SportsFest” and “The National”; but the city has always had rich history with collectors.
[FULL STORY]
 
The Business of Baseball
by Dan Migala

Chicago’s on-the-diamond achievements have been well-documented by baseball historians but the Windy City is also home to many of the games more impressive moments in the front office.
[FULL STORY]
 
Beer and Baseball: A Look Back
by Steve Hamburg

Beer and baseball are as inseparable as Ruth and Gehrig, Mantle and Maris, or Tinker to Evers to Chance. From the earliest days of the professional game, beer has been much more than the fans’ refreshment of choice. The brewing industry and the National Pastime have been loyal partners.
[FULL STORY]
 
Casey Crosby
Prep Baseball Report
by Sean Duncan

Casey Crosby could’ve easily packed it in. Worse yet, he could’ve lost that ah-shucks smile that sweeps over him every time he steps on a baseball diamond. It would’ve been easy for him to do. Regrettable, but understandable.
[FULL STORY]
 
A Chicago Tavern
A Goat, a Curse, and the American Dream
by Rick Kogan

Before the fourth game of the World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Detroit Tigers at Wrigley Field on October 6, 1945 a special bus carrying reporters from their headquarters at the Palmer House breaks down at Belmont Avenue, forcing the newsmen to thumb rides to the park; actress June Haver rushes onto the field and kisses Cubs’ manager Charlie Grimm; team owner Philip K. Wrigley entertains National League executives in the club’s private press lounge called the Pink Poodle; Andy Frain has 525 ushers on hand to handle the crowd of 42,923. Only one of those people is causing a problem.
[FULL STORY]
 
Andrew "Rube" Foster Excerpt
Chicago Aces: The First 75 Years
by John Freyer and Mark Rucker

Andrew 'Rube' Foster Andrew 'Rube' Foster was an outstanding pitcher, a shrewd manager and the dominant force behind the growth of Black baseball in America.
[FULL STORY]
 
Wrigley Field's Last World Series
The Wartime Chicago Cubs and The Pennant of 1945
by Chuck Billington

On the eve of World War II, baseball was truly the national pastime. In big city sandlots and rural open spaces, in high schools and colleges of all sizes, children and students played ball. When school was out, teenagers played on American Legion teams, while adults who still had an itch to play gravitated toward community leagues and, where talent warranted, the semipros. But even these outlets were not enough to satisfy Americans’ passion for the sport; in addition to playing, they wanted to watch.
[FULL STORY]
 
Pre-National League Excerpt
Chicago Aces: The First 75 Years
by John Freyer and Mark Rucker

Chicago Aces: The First 75 Years Baseball first appeared in Chicago as early as 1856, at least that’s what’s been documented. I’m sure it was there even earlier. Recent research suggests that the pioneers of the North-West (our Midwest), were playing townball in Rockford in 1848.
[FULL STORY]
 
We Want To Hear From You!
Contribute to our newsletter

Are you interested in appearing in the next edition of the Chicago Baseball Museum newsletter?
[FULL STORY]
 
Donate to CBM
To help the Chicago Baseball Museum fulfill its mission, we encourage the support of friends and members of Chicago’s baseball community. Your assistance is crucial to the development of the project.
[FULL STORY]
 
Volunteer
Volunteer opportunities will become available as the museum continues to grow. See how you can make a difference.
[FULL STORY]
 
Promote CBM
A great way to help promote the Chicago Baseball Museum is by word-of-mouth and merchandising.
[FULL STORY]
 
ARCHIVE
A 501(c)(3) non-profit organization
April 14, 2007
Vol. 2007 Issue 2
A 501(c)(3) non-profit organization
January 15, 2007
Vol. 2007 Issue 1
All-Star Game
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Published by Dr. David J. Fletcher
Copyright © 2007 Chicago Baseball Museum. All rights reserved.
The Chicago Baseball Museum is tax exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.
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