CARP

October 24, 2014




Newfoundland and Labrador Paid Family Caregiving Program
CARP gets the details on new program


Access to home care support is a national issue with different provincial solutions seeking to allow more people in need of care to access support services in the comfort of their homes. Newfoundland and Labrador Paid Family Caregiving Option is charting a new course to enhance long term care and community support services by offering persons in need of care the option to hire and pay a family member to provide the essential service. No such initiative has yet been implemented anywhere in Canada. Read more

A Mayoral Debate on Seniors Issues
Toronto Mayoral Debate Video Now Available Online


John Tory, Doug Ford, and Olivia Chow face off with Dale Goldhawk host of “Goldhawk Fights Back” on The New AM 740 – Zoomer Radio. Read more





Assisted Dying Report
The CARP Membership Poll Analysis


The vast majority of CARP members approve of legalizing assisted dying, and they have for years, no matter how the question is asked. Agreement is increasing in recent years, as well. Two thirds of members would consider assisted dying for themselves if they were terminally ill, and a fifth know someone who has had assistance dying. There is wide (and sustained) agreement the decision on assisted dying is between a doctor and patient, or belongs to the patient alone. Few think the authorities should be involved. Read more

Our laws have not kept pace with Canadian views on assisted death
CARP Poll findings seem consistent with other survey conducted on this issue


‘If I cannot give consent to my own death, whose body is this? Who owns my life?” Sue Rodriguez famously asked. The Supreme Court rejected her attempts to strike down the Criminal Code provisions making assisted suicide a crime, in large part because the prohibition was deemed to be consistent with Canadian values. Twenty-one years later, as the top court prepares to revisit the issue, Ms. Rodriguez’s whispered question has become a coast-to-coast shout. Our values have changed. So have our expectations. Our laws, and our lawmakers, have not kept pace. Read more





Medically Assisted Dying: An Adult Conversation
Reminder: Tune In to Vision TV Monday, October 20 at 9 pm ET


Canada’s right-to-die movement turned a major corner this year when Quebec passed a law permitting physician-assisted death for some terminally ill patients. Those leading the charge say the rest of the country will soon follow suit. That hasn’t stopped the decades-long and passionate YES/NO debate from continuing but we need to move on to how Canadians will address the issues within their own families. Given this new reality, and the potential for more legislation, hosts Libby Znaimer and CARP VP Advocacy Susan Eng explore the latest developments in the right-to-die movement and what families need to know as they grapple with end-of-life decisions with special guests MP Steven Fletcher, PQ MNA Veronique Hivon, The Globe and Mail’s Andre Picard and other key public figures who speak for doctors and nurses at the front lines of end-of-life care Read more




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A closer look at our public sector pension envy
Critics say public sector pension plans are unaffordable and unfair and should be wound up. Is it really be cheaper and fairer to do so?


Even if one was a diligent saver socking away all you could in a Registered Retirement Savings Plan, the 2008-09 stock market crash made you worth up to 40 per cent at the bottom. Markets have recovered — the current plunge notwithstanding — but even so, public sector pension envy has been on the rise. Safe. Secure. Indexed. A recent Toronto conference on pension reform sponsored by Canada’s Public Policy Forum, took a closer look at the divide. Critics say public sector plans are unaffordable and unfair, and should be wound up. But would it really be cheaper and fairer to do so? Read more

Problems with the Survey or a Story Link?

If you experience difficulty while filling out the survey or cannot get the full story, please click here and try again

CARP ORPP Poll
1. Do you know what a Pooled Registered Pension Plan, or PRPP is?

Yes

No

2. The federal government’s planned PRPPs are voluntary pension plans similar to defined contribution plans which allow employers to offer pooled plans to their employees. No employer contribution is required and employees can opt out. Do you agree or disagree PRPPs are a good way to fight Canada’s pension crisis?

Agree strongly

Agree

Disagree

Disagree strongly

DON’T KNOW

3. Would you enroll in PRPPs if your employer made them available, or would you have enrolled if they had been available when you were working?

Yes

No

DON’T KNOW

NEVER HEARD OF PRPPs

4. Ontario’s Retirement Pension Plan, or ORPP, closely resembles CARP’s proposed Universal Pension Plan, would require mandatory contributions from employers and employees to provide an additional 15% of pre-retirement income to supplement CPP. Do you agree or disagree the ORPP is a good way to provide a more secure retirement?

Agree strongly

Agree

Disagree

Disagree strongly

DON’T KNOW

5. The ORPP proposal exempts employers who offer a “comparable plan” to the ORPP from having to participate in the ORPP. What should be considered a “comparable plan” to the ORPP, which is modeled on the CPP?

Defined benefit plan

Defined contribution plan

Defined contribution plan with mandatory employer contribution

PRPP

PRPP with mandatory employer contribution

RRSP

Any other group savings plan

DON’T KNOW/OTHER

6. Do you agree or disagree PRPPs are “comparable” to the ORPP?

Agree strongly

Agree

Disagree

Disagree strongly

DON’T KNOW

7. Do you consider PRPPs to be “core” pension plans like defined benefit plans or the CPP, or voluntary savings plans like an RRSP or TFSA?

Core pension plan

Voluntary savings account

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

8. The ORPP is designed to replace about 15% of pre-retirement income. CPP is designed to replace another 25%. This is a total of 40% of pre-retirement income. Many experts say retirees should have about 70% of pre-retirement income to maintain their standard of living. What needs to be done to bridge the gap between the two amounts?

Significantly expand CPP

Modestly expand CPP

Provinces to enact PRPP legislation

Provinces to parallel ORPP

Retirees to save more/effectively

Create national supplementary Universal Pension Plan

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

9. Lower income employees and others may not be able to afford to save for retirement. Below what income cut-off should employees NOT have to pay ORPP premiums and NOT receive ORPP benefits?

$10,000 or less

$15,000 or less

$20,000 or less

$25,000 or less

$30,000 or less

More than this

SHOULD NOT BE EXCLUDED

DON’T KNOW

10. Employers receive a tax deduction for the contributions they make to employee pensions, reducing the cost to them by up to half. What is your opinion about giving employers an increased tax deduction for contributions made for low-wage workers or other incentive to reduce their costs?

Agree - employers are struggling now

Agree – would reduce their opposition to ORPP or CPP increase

Disagree – would subsidize large employers who pay low wages

Disagree strongly – any subsidy should go to workers

DON’T KNOW

10a. Low wage earners struggle to save for retirement and measures are needed to either help them save or to reduce the claw-back of income supports like GIS when they retire. What is your reaction to this dilemma?

Increase income supports

Subsidize pension contributions

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

11. In the next election, what position do you expect the federal Conservatives to take on pensions?

Call for expanding CPP a great deal

Call for expanding CPP modestly

Call for provinces to enact PRPP legislation

Call for provinces to join the ORPP

Call for more study

Do nothing

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

12. What position do you expect the federal New Democrats to take on pensions?

Call for expanding CPP a great deal

Call for expanding CPP modestly

Call for provinces to enact PRPP legislation

Call for provinces to join the ORPP

Call for more study

Do nothing

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

13. What position do you expect the federal Liberals to take on pensions?

Call for expanding CPP a great deal

Call for expanding CPP modestly

Call for provinces to enact PRPP legislation

Call for provinces to join the ORPP

Call for more study

Do nothing

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

13a Which parties do you expect to ACTUALLY return the OAS eligibility age to 65?

Just the NDP

Just the Liberals

Just the Conservatives

Both the NDP and Liberals

Both the NDP and Conservatives

Both the Liberals and Conservatives

All of the NDP, Liberals and Conservatives

NONE OF THEM

DON’T KNOW

14. Would you change the way you normally vote in order to vote for a party which promised real, significant pension reform and CPP expansion?

Yes would change the way I normally vote

No, would not change the way I normally vote

OTHER/DON’T KNOW

15. Do you agree or disagree Ontario will succeed in convincing most provinces to join or parallel the ORPP, making it a national program?

Agree strongly

Agree

Disagree

Disagree strongly

DON’T KNOW

16. Do you think the ORPP will be regarded as a success?

Yes

No

DON’T KNOW

17. If a federal election were held tomorrow, which party’s candidate would you support?

Conservative

Liberal

NDP

Green Party

Bloc Quebecois

OTHER

UNDECIDED

18. Where do you live?

Newfoundland

Nova Scotia

PEI

New Brunswick

Quebec

Ontario

Manitoba

Saskatchewan

Alberta

BC/Territories

19. What is your gender?

Male

Female

  [See Results]
Previous Issues/Archives
September 6th, 2014
September 23rd, 2014
September 11th, 2014
August 28th, 2014
August 9th, 2014
July 31st, 2014
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On The Beach
The Middle-Aged Guide to Growing Up


I had asked my mother to bring along her mother-in-law’s engagement ring, an intricate filigree with three pre-South African diamonds from India. It was inscribed inside the band with the date of her engagement, three months before the Titanic sank. I was going to ask my girlfriend to marry me. Everybody in the family knew except my girlfriend, which was tactically rather unwise in that, had she said no, I wouldn’t have been able to go back to the villa. My plan was to take her out for dinner on the scooter, then go to a cove near the house where the surf crashed in to watch the town fireworks. I’d pop the question at midnight. Read more

De-prescribing medications to improve your health or Which drug can I stop first?
Ask a Doctor


Are you worried about the side effects of the medication you are taking? According to a report released by the Canadian Institute for Health Information, nearly two-thirds of adults aged 65 years and older take at least five prescription drugs and more than 40 per cent of Canadians age 85 and older take 10 drugs or more per day. That is an alarming figure. It is therefore not surprising that 88% of older women and 63% of older men across Canada express concern about the side effects of their medications. In Canada, we have a lot of practice prescribing drugs to help manage health ailments but our doctors and pharmacists have very little knowledge about how to de-prescribe drugs. Read more

Canadians Search Through Different Pockets to Fund Health Care in Retirement
Conference Board of Canada Report


Canadian health care is a mix of publicly and privately paid services. As the population ages, services such as home or personal care, nursing home care, or medical equipment will become increasingly important to the growing number of seniors, and not all this care will be publicly covered. One of the objectives of the EKOS Research Associates survey of home and residential care for the Conference Board is to understand Canadians’ opinions about how they will pay potential out-of-pocket costs. Read more

PEI joins national securities regulator plan
Total of five provinces now joining the federal government in establishing NSR


Prince Edward Island has joined Ottawa’s move to create a national securities regulator, bringing the total to five provinces who have signed onto the plan. The federal Finance Department said Thursday the province has signed a memorandum of agreement to join the Co-operative Capital Markets Regulatory System. Read more

Postal workers go to court to save home delivery
CUPW launching constitutional challenge


The union representing postal workers is launching a constitutional challenge against Canada Post’s move to eliminate door-to-door home delivery. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers announced Thursday that it is asking the Federal Court to put a stop to Canada Post’s changes first announced last December. “In Canada, people should count, not just the bottom line,” said CUPW national president Denis Lemelin, in a news release. It is filing the challenge on the grounds the changes violate the rights of seniors and those with disabilities, protected under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Read more

The pros and cons of longevity
Living longer might mean working longer...


Statistics clearly show that Canadians are living longer. While a long life can be a good thing, longevity also brings with it some unique financial challenges on both a micro and macro level. A recent study on longevity by the Office of the Chief Actuary of Canada predicts the country will continue to have one of the highest life expectancies of the world along with Japan, France, Switzerland, Italy and Australia. As life spans increase, people need to account for the financial and health issues that come with the possibility of living a longer life. Read more

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